Big Walk Reception

Thank you so much to Eden Project Communities walkers and the support team for coming to visit Orchard Park last week. We enjoyed showing you our wildlife habitats and what we do, and chatting with you and folks from our local community whilst tucking into tasty tea and cake. Cambridge put on great weather for you 🙂

We hope you enjoyed the whole walk and each had a well earned great day at your respective local #TheBigLunch 🙂

A great big thank you too to: Orchard Park Community Council for hosting the event, and to OPCC Chair, Andrew Chan, for providing the lovely cakes and accompanying the walkers through Cambridge and onto Empty Common Community Garden (near Cambridge University Botanic Gardens) and Margaret Wright Community Orchard (off Newmarket Road near Coldhams Common) for a tea party potlock, to the residents of Marmalade Lane who showed us real community spirit, and to Andy Pugh for helping with everything from start to finish.



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OP Dawn Chorus birds ID’d and Wing Fluttering Fledgelings

Robin singing Orchard Park

Instead of the 5 minutes as instructed by Cambridge Natural History Society’s citizen science instructions, I’d set my recorder to go for an hour…. Bob Jarman of CNHS was willing to listen to identify the birds he heard, and patiently listened through the hour long recording twice. I found it very relaxing listening to the birds add to the song in the early hours. A shame about the rain, and racing cars, and road noise. After about 15 minutes many more birds join in. You could just be surprised though, you might get an hour of calm if you listen, as Bob did, twice.

Click here for the recording

Thank you very much indeed Bob for identifying them for us. These are the birds he heard:

Robin: 2

Blackbird: 2

Dunnock: 1 briefly towards end

Song Thrush: 1 briefly and distant towards end. 

In last 10+ minutes a knocking I couldn’t identify – could be bird tapping on feeder but don’t think it’s vocal. 

It’s Fledgeling Time Again

Starling adult feeding young

So far I’ve seen young Blue Tits, Great Tits, and Starlings coming to feed.

See these blog posts for more information on their wing fluttering behaviour, what to do if you’ve seen a fledgling you’re concerned about, and what to feed them. Don’t forget to break peanuts up to make them smaller and suitable for young birds before you put them out.

Juvenile Goldfinches

Fledgelings

Natural History Society Cambridge – do some Citizen Science from your bed this week!

Robin Orchard Park Garden

An opportunity to do some Citizen Science from your bed. Be quick though, you need to do your recordings this week…..Click the link above to out about Citizen Science.

Adapted from Nat Hist Cam Project Facebook Post 4 May at 19:11

A message from #NatHistCam‘s Duncan Mackay:

It was dawn chorus day on Sunday morning… here is how you can almost effortlessly contribute data to NatHistCam and enjoy the dawn chorus in your garden as well.

I have been experimenting with using a mobile phone to record the dawn chorus. This is recording the dawn chorus out of your bedroom window, so it involves no early morning expeditions into the wilds of Cambridge, merely placing a smart phone on an empty mug on your bedroom window sill and opening the window to let the wonderful sounds of the dawn chorus into your bedroom. Matched with your post code this will provide lots of bird data which will add to our knowledge of the song birds of the city.

This is the method I have tried and it seems to work very well.

1) If you haven’t got a sound/voice recorder on your phone download one from the ap store. There are lots of good free ones and they seem to work quite well. The one i have been using is voice recorder by quality aps. It gets a score of 4.8* on the google app store….so it’s pretty good. I am sure something similar is available for apple)

2) I set the app to record in mp3 in the settings (which is more compressed than most other formats and works very well)

3) I then place the phone on a mug (just something handy to raise it up a little) by an open window.

4) At between 4am and 5am (set your alarm) You start it recording and record typically 5 mins of the bird song. The phone should automatically adjust the recording volume to capture the relatively quiet sounds.

5) Email me the recording for analysis to a special email address for this frostedorange53@aol.com (A special email for this project…frosted orange is a rather gorgeous moth and has no other significance) please add to your email: your name and email address and post code of where recorded and the date and time of the recording

6) I will then put the mp3 you send me into audacity (which is a really good sound editing program) and adjust the volume of the recording

7) We (Me and I hope Bob Jarman will help) will listen to the recordings to identify the singing birds and work out what birds are singing where in Cambridge

8) You can do more than one recording as the species singing can change during the dawn chorus

9) If you cant do it on Sunday then any day the following week will do but please say which day you recorded it on.

I hope you will enjoy this easy way to enjoy the dawn chorus. You can go back to bed once its done!

UN report says nature is in worst shape in human history

Trees and shrubs being removed in Orchard Park due to A14 road widening, April 2019

Taken directly from the Associated Press website: “Nature is in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday in the United Nations’ first comprehensive report on biodiversity.

It’s all because of humans, but it’s not too late to fix the problem, the report said.

Species loss is accelerating to a rate tens or hundreds of times faster than in the past, the report said. More than half a million species on land “have insufficient habitat for long-term survival” and are likely to go extinct, many within decades, unless their habitats are restored. The oceans are not any better off.

Conservation scientists from around the world convened in Paris to issue the report, which exceeded 1,000 pages. The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) included more than 450 researchers who used 15,000 scientific and government reports. The report’s summary was approved by representatives of all 109 nations.”

From the IPBES press release: “To increase the policy-relevance of the Report, the assessment’s authors have ranked, for the first time at this scale and based on a thorough analysis of the available evidence, the five direct drivers of change in nature with the largest relative global impacts so far. These culprits are, in descending order: (1) changes in land and sea use; (2) direct exploitation of organisms; (3) climate change; (4) pollution and (5) invasive alien species.

Despite progress to conserve nature and implement policies, the Report also finds that global goals for conserving and sustainably using nature and achieving sustainability cannot be met by current trajectories, and goals for 2030 and beyond may only be achieved through transformative changes across economic, social, political and technological factors.

OP Can we give a Great Big Welcome? The Great Big Walk 2019

Picture Credit: Eden Project Communities Website

The following information has been adapted from the Eden Project Communities Network website and the Eden Project Communities Blog.

Join The Big Lunch Community Walk 2019 in Cambridge! #TheBigLunch 

The Big Lunch community walk is just around the corner and the Eden Project Communities folks can’t wait to announce their amazing walkers this year.

From 17 May, four teams (one from each nation) will step out on four routes to shine a light on people who bring their communities closer together.  They’re walking up an appetite for The Big Lunch and inviting everyone to join in on the Big Lunch during the first weekend in June.  

Orchard Park Wildlife Project was very lucky to be able to go to an Eden Project Communities Camp a couple of years ago. We joined the folks from the 2017 Great Big Walk at the end of their day at in the south of Cambridge at Nightingale Gardens, and since then we’ve enjoyed and learned at a workshop at Birmingham Botanic Gardens, and during online workshops. Thank you so much Eden Project Communities for your support 😀🙏

Join in the Walk at Orchard Park

When: Thursday 30 May at 11.00am

Where: Multi Use Room at the Sports Ground on Ring Fort Road

The walkers will be reaching Cambridge on Thursday 30 May, and they’re going to visit Orchard Park at 11.00! Do join us. Orchard Park Wildlife Project and Orchard Park Community Council will welcome them at the Multi Use Room at the Sports Ground on Ring Fort Road and show them some of our wildlife habitats, and activities we’re doing to help make Orchard Park better for people and wildlife. We’ll provide drinks and Andrew Chan, Chair of Orchard Park Community Council will be making some of his delicious cakes.

They’re moving onto Empty Commons Community Garden (near Cambridge University Botanic Gardens) to be there for around 1pm and then walking from there to the Margaret Wright Community Orchard (off Newmarket Road near Coldhams Common) for a tea party potlock between 4-6pm. The idea is to connect our green projects and our communities, and people are welcomed and encouraged to join in on the walk through Cambridge. You can join us just at Orchard Park, walk throughout the day, or for a little of the day. It’s up to you how long you stay, but we hope you will join us.

Jo Brand, presiding over the opening ceremony for the walk last year, said “Last year there were so many negative things going on in the world, it was nice for three weeks to be able to shine a light on the incredibly determined walkers and the diverse communities all over the UK coming together to welcome them passing through. I urge anyone to consider stepping up for the challenge this year…if nothing else it’s the perfect excuse to eat cake all day as you potter along!”.

Over two weeks, the walkers will journey across England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales and will walk home just in time to bring out the chairs and hang the bunting for their own Big Lunch – that’s what they call dedication!

Every day on their travels, the walkers will be connecting people and communities across the UK and finding out how they are preparing for our biggest weekend of the year.  Their teams will be reaching out to people along the way, spreading the word about The Big Lunch and encouraging everyone to join in, share food and have fun where they live.

Saturday’s Litter Pick in and around the Wildlife Area, and OP

Many thanks indeed to the organisers and everyone that came along to help with the Spring Clean of the Wildlife Area, surrounding areas, and OP more widely on Saturday. Even though the weather wasn’t favourable 22 people came along to help. Some from nearby and some from afar. OP Community Council Chair Andrew Chan had registered the event with Niantic, the developers of Pokémon Go, and as a result we were very grateful that two people travelled all the way from London to catch Pokémon in Cambridge, as well as help with our litter pick! Niantic were running an Earth Day Clean Up in association with Playmob (see: http://niantic.playmob.com), after Earth Day on 22 April. Globally there were 14800 people taking part!

Credit: Pokémon Go Twitter Feed

Thanks also to Greater Cambridge Shared Waste Service, a partnership between South Cambridgeshire District and Cambridge City Councils – they provided the pickers and equipment and collected the litter we’d piled up, and to Keep Britain Tidy who’d provided posters and recycled bags to collect litter in.

Andrew had made some delicious cup cakes to thank people for their efforts, and OP Community Council had organised the event and gave tea, biscuits, and chocolates to volunteers.

We estimated that around 100kg of litter was removed from in and around the Wildlife Area, and Orchard Park more widely. It’s a shame we have to do repeated litter picks, and obviously more needs to be done in Orchard Park to make sure the amount of litter is reduced in the first place.

On the whole though, everywhere is looking a bit better than this time last year, when we collected 60+ bin bags of litter.

It’s nice to see the Wildlife Area looking cleaner, though further effort is still needed to ensure the smaller plastic and packaging foam is removed before it’s broken down further or eaten by wildlife. There’s also a big problem with cigarette butts which must be eliminated “discarded cigarette butts may present health risks to human infants and animals because of indiscriminate eating behaviours. Nicotine found in cigarette butts may cause vomiting and neurological toxicity; leachates of cigarette butts…may cause exposure to additional toxic chemicals including heavy metals, ethyl phenol and pesticide residues” (Novotny et al 2011). If they’re not washed away in drains to pollute water, then they leak chemicals which poison the soil….

It was great to meet new people, and hear about how you’re helping our local wildlife at home. OPWP also provided information to volunteers about the dangers of litter to wildlife and our environment, and tips to help the wildlife on our doorstep and our local environment. We’ll be in touch with those of you that signed up for OP Wildlife Project emails when we’ve set a date for our next activity.

Thanks so much again all, on behalf of the wildlife of OP 🙂

Reference:

Novotny, T. E., Hardin, S. N., Hovda, L. R., Novotny, D. J., McLean, M. K. & Khan, S., 2011. Tobacco and cigarette butt consumption in humans and animals. Tob. Control. Vol. 20(1).

Help for Hedgehogs coming out of Hibernation

Hedgehog OP Wildlife Area, waking up last year, low weight.
Photo Credit: Andrew Chan
Photo credit: Andrew Chan
Rehabilitated Hedgehog sleeping during soft release into OP Wildlife Area

“Hedgehogs are in serious decline in the UK but putting further obstacles in their way when they wake from the dangers of hibernation is easily avoided with a little knowledge and caring. Please take the time to make your garden more hedgehog and wildlife friendly there is lots of info from  organisations on the internet or check out Pledges for Hedgies page” (source: Willows Hedgehog Rescue).

Late March and April is when Hedgehogs begin to wake from their winter hibernation. The Hedgehog Street website describes hibernation as follows “during hibernation hedgehogs are not really asleep, instead they drop their body temperature to match their surroundings and enter a state of torpor. This allows them to save a lot of energy but slows down all other bodily functions making normal activity impossible.” Further “While in hibernation the hedgehog’s fuel supply comes from the fat stores it has built up over the summer. Eating enough before hibernation is vital and this is when supplementary feeding can prove important to hedgehogs.”

When the hedgehog wakes, it can have used up one third of its body weight – appearing weak, wobbly, and disorientated as a result. It’s vital that hedgehogs can access freshwater as a priority as they wake. Next they need food (see: waking hedgehogs Willows Hedgehog Rescue)

Also in March and April, Hedgehogs are at great risk in the garden, when according to Willows Rescue Centre in Bromsgrove “Hedgehogs are admitted to rescue centres with soft tissue injuries from strimmers and garden forks, factured bones from spades and forks. The injuries are often horrific with operations needed and long periods of rehabilitation. A number of the admissions will be put to sleep straight away due to the extent of the injuries. Sad, when you think that the animal has managed to survive the rigours of winter lowering its metabolism to near death in order to survive only to be seriously injured by human activity.

It is easy to avoid most of these situations.

  • Check before you clear, cut back or carry out work on any shrubs or bushes.
  • Check first before putting a spade or fork into the compost heap.
  • Check under sheds or any structures in the garden before removing them if you are replacing them- hedgehogs like to nest in that gap under garden sheds and patio decking.
  • Check before you mow or strim the grass.

Check with a torch, a gloved hand, your boot or gently with a stick. Gently poking and tapping a hedgehog may slightly annoy it but it will mean that you don’t injure or possibly kill it.”

To make a feeding Station

A feeding station will help stop cats or foxes stealing the Hedgehog’s food the instructions that follow were taken directly from The Hedgehog.

Build  or buy a small feeding station or house to put the food into that will only allow hedgehogs to get in.

This will also help keep the food, especially biscuits dry in the rain and prevents it freezing in the winter.

Put the water OUTSIDE the feeding station. ( In freezing weather put water inside the feeding station)

The quick, cheap and easy way:

  • Get a plastic storage box about 12″ wide by 18″ long (or bigger)
  • Either use it with the lid on, or turn the box upside down. Cut a 4″ to 5″ hole ( about a large fist size) in one of the short ends.
  • Tape around the cut-out hole
  • Hedgehogs can be messy eaters, so put plenty of newspaper on the floor of the box
  • Put the food at the opposite end so a fox or cat cannot put their long arm in and pull out the food
  • Put a brick or heavy weight on top of the box, to stop it being knocked over or the lid pulled off.
  • If cats or foxes still try to get in, then place the box about 6″ away from a wall as shown in the last 3 pictures (with the entrance facing towards the wall)

You should end up with something that looks like this:

Photo credit: The Hedgehog

Communities Communicate – Stop the Chop

Nicole Barton, Histon and Impington Sustainability Group, Andrew Chan, Chair Orchard Park Community Council, and Pippa Heyling, South Cambridgeshire District Council at the A14 bridge at J32 with our communities’ collective artwork communicating our dismay at Highways England removing more trees during bird’s nesting season

It’s bird nesting season and for the second consecutive year this is happening in Histon and Impington, and this year also in Orchard Park ….. Highways England is clearing trees and shrubs.

Left a section of the A14 embankment in Orchard Park last year – this shows typical vegetation all along the embankment as it was last year. Today well over a 100 metres of the embankment looks like the photo on the right, and more trees and shrubs may be cleared yet.

All birds are protected from having their nests destroyed or removed during nesting season by the Wildlife and Countryside Act. Birds included in Schedule I of the Act are also protected from disturbance at nesting time. A license is needed to destroy or remove nests during nesting time.

We’re waiting for the ecological reports from Highways England whose representative yesterday claimed no trees were being removed from Orchard Park when clearly many already had been. It’s hard to believe not a single nest had been built in any of the vegetation that has been cleared.

Below are photos of artwork created by Histon and Impington residents to communicate dismay at Highways England’s tree and vegetation clearance, and the importance of trees for wildlife and clean air. The art, including lots created by children, was attached to the A14 Junction 32 bridge last night around 6pm, by 6am this morning, all had been removed. We’ve been silenced.