Planting for Improved Garden Security and Wildlife Benefit at Crime Prevention event tonight

 

fp Crime reduction and wildlife friendly plants copy

Op Hunter security event – Orchard Park

Wednesday 29 March 17:00 – 19:30 hrs

The Orchard Community Centre, Central Avenue, Orchard Park, Cambridge, CB4 2EZ

Cambridgeshire Constabulary are holding a crime prevention event at Orchard Park community centre to highlight security improvements that residents can make to protect their homes and reduce opportunist crime.

Officers and staff will be available to provide advice and information. A senior officer will be providing a crime prevention seminar at 6.30p.m.

There will also be security products available at a discounted rate, as well as information about property registration and coding.

Neighbourhood teams will be patrolling and visiting local streets, to increase security awareness.

Please come along to find out more (Source: https://southcambscops.org/2017/03/22/op-hunter-security-event-orchard-park/)


Orchard Park Wildlife Project will be there to advise on plants that can help with security at the same time as being beneficial to wildlife – idea by Kate Parsley.

Plants recommended for their defensive properties on the Crime Prevention Website that also benefit wildlife

 

Shrubs and small trees

Please note the top of the table is not showing all of the information. Scroll down to the link for a PDF complete version

Plant and defence grade (1st-3rd)1 Defensive Properties1 Flowers / berries Height1, type, and how to plant Wildlife benefits
Berberis sp.

 

Berberis thunbergii
(3 effective defense)

Berberis stenophylla
(2 very effective defense)

All Berberis are spiny and make excellent barrier hedges Deciduous varieties have good autumn colour, flowers April-May, has berries2 3m Best planted in a group with other shrubs. An evergreen, it prefers full sun and a moist soil, growing slowly2 Food and shelter

 

B. thunbergii can provide berries into autumn and winter2

Birds are attracted to the berries, whilst the thorns provide a barrier for safe nesting sites2

Japonica, Japanese Quince

Chaenomeles speciosa
(2 effective defense)

A thorn-bearing shrub with white flowers that is often wall trained Attractive red or orange spring flowers which are followed by sizeable yellow fruit3 2m A thorny, spreading shrub that can be allowed to do its own thing. Will tolerate some shade3 Food: flowers and berries3

 

Birds eat fruit and use dense branches as protection and nest sites.

Flowers attractive to bees and bumblebees3

Provides nectar and pollen for solitary bees4

Hawthorn

 

Crataegus monogyna

(1 extremely effective)

Crataegus prunifolia a compact variety

(1 extremely effective)

Ideal hedge barrier, thorny and dense White flowers in late spring followed by bright red berries5 7+m Tolerates a wide variety of conditions, including polluted and exposed sites5A Food and shelter5

Blackbird, Bluetits, Bullfinch, Chaffinch, Crows, Dunnock, Goldfinch, Robin, Starlings, Waxwings etc feed on berries5

Black Veined White Butterfly caterpillar food plant. Flowers also visited by adult butterflies seeking nectar: Brimstone, Chinese Character, Grey Dagger, Lackey, Lappet, Lesser Yellow Underwing, Light Emerald, Mottled Beauty, Mottled Pug, Swallowtailed, Vapourer and Yellow-tail Moth food plant. Small Eggar Moth food plant when hedges left untrimmed in summer5

Host to innumerable insects5

Small mammals e.g. mice, bank voles and foxes take berries5

Common Holly

Ilex aquifolium

(2 very effective defense)

Ideal for barrier plantings Male and female flowers are on separate shrubs; for a female shrub to produce berries, it must be pollinated by a male growing nearby6 2m Grows in any soil and copes well with full sun or shade6 Food and shelter6

 

Bees and bumblebees collect its nectar and pollen.

Caterpillars of the holly blue butterfly eat buds and flowers.

Birds: Thrushes, Robins, Dunnocks, finches etc. use it for nesting as it provides excellent protection.

Blackbirds, thrushes etc. eat berries.

Hedgehogs, small mammals, toads and slow worms hibernate in deep leaf litter that builds up beneath it6

Oregon Grape

Mahonia aquifolium
(3 effective defense)

Mahonia media

(2 very effective defense)

Low growing shrub with spiny leaves Clusters of bright yellow flowers are produced in spring, followed by spherical, blue-black berries7 1.5m Vigorous, suckering shrub that can cope with most soils and thrive in shady spots where many other plants succumb7 Food7

 

Nectar and pollen may be taken by Blackcaps, Bluetits and House Sparrows. Berries eaten by Blackbirds and Mistle Thrushes7

Excellent early-flowering nectar source for bees and bumblebees.

Bright-line Brown-eye, Cabbage and Peppered Moth caterpillar food plant7

New Zealand Holly

Olearia             macrodonta

(3 effective defense)

Shrub for exposed sites, with silver-toothed leaves Clusters of white, fragrant, daisy-like flowerheads8 1.5m Sun-loving plant which is hardy in warmer parts of the country. It tolerates wind, and do well in towns8 Food8

 

Flowers are attractive to bees and many species of fly8

Blackthorn, Sloe

Prunus spinosa

(1 extremely effective)

Excellent dense defensive shrub or small tree. Snowy white blossom appears in very early spring before the leaves and is followed in late autumn by the purplish-black fruits10 1.8m Very tough and tolerant of most soils and situations, including wet, exposed sites10 Food and Shelter9

Flowering, blackthorn provides a valuable source of nectar and pollen for bees in spring. Its foliage is a food plant for the caterpillars of many moths, including the Lackey, Magpie, Common Emerald, Small Eggar, Swallow-tailed and Yellow-tailed. Also used by Black and Brown Hairstreak butterflies.

Birds nest among the dense, thorny thickets, eat caterpillars and other insects from the leaves, and feast on the berries in autumn9

Roses
(2 very effective defense)Dog RoseRosa caninaField rose
Rosa arvensisIt is illegal to plant Rosa rugosa in the wild or allow it to ‘escape’!11
Dense and thorny vegetation Flowers 2-9m dependent on variety. Old-fashioned varieties are fragrant and disease-resistant11 Food and flowers11

Hybrid tea roses, are also useful addition11

 

Fruits popular with birds.

Wide range of insects attracted to the flowers including bees and butterflies11

Gorse

Ulex europaeus

(1 extremely effective)

Superb barrier shrub Small yellow flowers12 1.5m Grows well on poor dry soils1 Food and shelter12

Nest sites for birds, important for invertebrates12

Refuge for birds in harsh weather. In flower for long periods – an important nectar source in early spring and early winter, when little else is in flower12

Idea by Kate Parsley, Chair, OPWP

Please note some of the information at the top of the table is obscured due to the automatic layout of the webpage. To see a full PDF version of the table, click here: table summarised

Sources:

1 https://thecrimepreventionwebsite.com/garden-%20boundaries-fences-and-defensive-plants/618/defensive-%20plants-shrubs-and-trees-shrub-fences/

2 https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/bird-and-wildlife-guides/a-z-of-a-wildlife-garden/atoz/b/berberis.aspx

3 http://www.wildaboutgardens.org.uk/plants/shrub/chaenomeles-japonica.aspx

4 http://www.joyofplants.com/wildlife/picklist.phpname=meadow&pl=5&adv=1&ot=&r=0&g=0&p=4&o=926

5 http://www.wildaboutgardens.org.uk/plants/tree/crataegus-monogyna.aspx

5A https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/bird-and-wildlife-guides/a-z-of-a-wildlife-garden/atoz/h/hawthorn.aspx

6 https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/bird-and-wildlife-guides/a-z-of-a-wildlife-garden/atoz/h/holly.aspx

7 http://wildaboutgardens.org.uk/plants/shrub/mahonia-aquifolium.aspx

8 http://www.joyofplants.com/wildlife/picklist.php?name=common&pl=5&adv=1&ot=&r=0&g=0&p=4&o=984

9 https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/visiting-woods/trees-woods-and-wildlife/british-trees/native-trees/blackthorn/

10 http://www.britishhardwood.co.uk/prunus-spinosa-blackthorn/155/

11 https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/bird-and-wildlife-guides/a-z-of-a-wildlife-garden/atoz/r/rose.aspx

12 https://www.rspb.org.uk/ourwork/conservation/advice/gorse/

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