Communities Communicate – Stop the Chop

Nicole Barton, Histon and Impington Sustainability Group, Andrew Chan, Chair Orchard Park Community Council, and Pippa Heyling, South Cambridgeshire District Council at the A14 bridge at J32 with our communities’ collective artwork communicating our dismay at Highways England removing more trees during bird’s nesting season

It’s bird nesting season and for the second consecutive year this is happening in Histon and Impington, and this year also in Orchard Park ….. Highways England is clearing trees and shrubs.

Left a section of the A14 embankment in Orchard Park last year – this shows typical vegetation all along the embankment as it was last year. Today well over a 100 metres of the embankment looks like the photo on the right, and more trees and shrubs may be cleared yet.

All birds are protected from having their nests destroyed or removed during nesting season by the Wildlife and Countryside Act. Birds included in Schedule I of the Act are also protected from disturbance at nesting time. A license is needed to destroy or remove nests during nesting time.

We’re waiting for the ecological reports from Highways England whose representative yesterday claimed no trees were being removed from Orchard Park when clearly many already had been. It’s hard to believe not a single nest had been built in any of the vegetation that has been cleared.

Below are photos of artwork created by Histon and Impington residents to communicate dismay at Highways England’s tree and vegetation clearance, and the importance of trees for wildlife and clean air. The art, including lots created by children, was attached to the A14 Junction 32 bridge last night around 6pm, by 6am this morning, all had been removed. We’ve been silenced.

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Spring 2019

Spring 2019 arrived in November 2018 

The Woodland Trust

From The Woodland Trust website: “The Woodland Trust’s Nature’s Calendar project has received over 64 records of early spring activity that started in November 2018 – including insects that have been spotted active up to 5 months earlier than normal.

Mild weather seems to have temporarily disturbed insects from hibernation. A small tortoiseshell butterfly appeared flying outdoors on Christmas Day in Merthyr Tydfil, and a red tailed bumblebee on Boxing Day in Somerset. The average date for small tortoiseshells is 14 April, and bumblebees 26 March – making both over three months early.…. a red admiral was seen on 17 December in Cambridgeshire; the average emergence date is 7 May, making it nearly five months ahead of schedule”

I saw a butterfly from the bus last week when travelling down Histon Rd but it was too distant to attempt identification.

To see how to get involved in the Woodland Trust’s Citizen Science project as a Nature’s Calendar recordersee our previous blog post – insert url, visit naturescalendar.woodlandtrust.org.uk. Or, to watch time lapse footage of trees throughout the seasons visit their YouTube channel.

So what can we do to help our local wildlife now spring seems to have sprung?

These ideas are from the Wildlife Trust Bedfordshire Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire Newsletter…      

  • Provide some early nectar for the insects:if you have a raised bed, larger style planter, a window box, or hanging basket, you could add snowdrops, crocuses, or winter aconites
  • To help hedgehogs and insects, and frogs and toads if you’re lucky enough to have them in your OP garden: don’t tidy up just yet! These creatures might be hibernating in dried up plant stems, under wood piles or broken plant pots, and some would like to remain undisturbed for a little longer
  • Get ahead for summer insects: and make your garden more colourful. Plant annuals such as Calendula and Nasturtiums, they’re bright and pretty and provide nectar.

Upcoming OPWP activities

Lush are very kindly holding a Charity Pot Party for us on 23 March – do come and say hello – we’ll be planting seeds and letting people know about the importance of choosing British native plants grown from pesticide free seeds to help bees and other insects. Research is showing seeds marketed as good for pollinators might be harming the very creatures you’re trying to help if the seeds you plant have been pre treated with pesticides. It’s best to buy organic seed from specialist suppliers such as: https://beehappyplants.co.uk

We’re organising a Spring Cleaning session in and around the Wildlife Area with OPCC – this will be during the last weekend of March on 30/31 TBC

We’ve got a session with the Beaver group on 5 April, this will be outdoors so we’ve waited for the clocks to go forwards.

We’ll be nest box painting at the end of the school Easter Holidays – check here and on Facebook for dates 27/28 April TBC.

We’re hoping to begin lizard monitoring again for the population off Neal Drive very soon with Cambridge and Peterborough Amphibian and Reptile Group. It’s very likely the lizard’s home will be built on soon, so we’re planning to work with the developer’s ecologists to see how many lizards there are, and to trap and move them to a new site that will be good for them in the longer term. There are a few details to sort out, and we’ve suggested Sunday 7 April TBC for a training day, watch this space. See our 2019 Lizard Monitoring Page for more information.

We’re also planning a workshop with artist Anna Roebuck. She creates beautiful things from recycled materials for early summer – we’re actively fundraising for this. This event will also provide information on the dangers of litter to our local wildlife, and wildlife more widely, as well as ways to reduce your rubbish output, and on better recycling.

Photo credit: Anna Roebuck

The Art of Wildlife

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Whilst looking for a UK wildlife themed birthday gift, I came across Alison Fennell’s art. I loved the depictions of native birds from the small – this beautifully bright blue tit, to the larger – a barn owl, with puffins, magpiesravens and other birds available in between. There are gorgeous prints of native mammals such as foxes and stags, as well African animals – giraffes, elephants to name a few. With a choice of over 160 different prints comprising frogs, seahorses, chickens, swans, rats and wrens, there’s likely to be something for most wildlife lovers.

I bought a barn owl print as the gift for a strigiformophile (I just made that word up). A very good choice as the response was “I love it”.

Originally, I’d needed the gift in a hurry and Alison sent it by special post to arrive very quickly. It was carefully packaged and neatly wrapped in pretty paper. You couldn’t ask for better customer service.

So if you’re looking for a wildlife themed gift, why not have a look at Alison’s wildlife themed prints – they offer a great way to encourage connection with wildlife. My blue tit makes me smile each time I look at it – thank you Alison.

For Alison’s shop see –  https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/AlisonFennellArt