Native Bluebells planted, thanks to On the Verge and OPCC – please tread carefully

On Saturday, thanks to On the Verge Cambridge and Orchard Park Community Council, native bluebells were planted in the Wildlife Area. On the Verge, who kindly provided the plants free of charge, is a voluntary group set up to promote wildflowers and pollinating plants around Cambridge. They aim to “provide an abundance of food sources for pollinating insects which are in catastrophic decline. By providing joined-up corridors of food for pollinators we can help them feed without having to fly long distances. We can make the city of Cambridge welcoming to pollinators through simply planting what they need. Increasing plant biodiversity in our city can have a positive impact on the insect population immediately.” (Source: On The Verge Website).

Thanks very much to Andrew Chan, Chair of OPCC for planting them, obviously we were unable to do this as a group activity in the current circumstances.

“File:Common Bluebell – Hyacinthoides non-scripta (28120065988).jpg” by Björn S… is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

The Woodland Trust say “enchanting and iconic, bluebells are a favourite with the fairies and a sure sign spring is in full swing.

Value to wildlife

Many insects reap the benefits of bluebells which flower earlier than many other plants. Woodland butterflies, bees and hoverflies all feed on their nectar. Bees can ‘steal’ the nectar from bluebells by biting a hole in the bottom of the flower, reaching the nectar without the need to pollinate the flower.

Planting in the Wildlife Area

Bluebells are unmistakable bell-shaped perennial herbs. They actually spend the majority of their time underground as bulbs, emerging, often in droves, to flower from April onwards.

Leaves: are narrow, around 7mm to 25mm wide and 45cm in length. They are strap-shaped, smooth and hairless, with a pointed tip.

Flowers: usually deep violet-blue in colour, bluebells are bell-shaped with six petals and up-turned tips. These sweet-smelling flowers nod or droop to one side of the flowering stem (known as an inflorescence) and have creamy white-coloured pollen inside. Some bluebell flowers can be white or pink. Up to 20 flowers can grow on one inflorescence.

Patch of planted bluebells, PLEASE TREAD CAREFULLY – they should spread via seed, and by vegetative propagation

Not to be confused with: Spanish bluebell (Hyacinthoides hispanica), which is very similar in appearance to the British bluebell. However, Spanish bluebells grow upright, with the flowers all around the stem, not drooping to one side like the British bluebell. Hybrid bluebell (Hyacinthoides x massartiana) is a mix of the British and Spanish bluebell. It is often very similar in appearance to our native bluebell, but might threaten its existence by out-competing it and diluting the gene pool.” (source information above was taken directly from the Bluebell (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) page at The Woodland Trust).

Cowslips on the bank opposite the Premier Inn

The Cowslips are coming out too, they’re quite prolific on the bank closest the Premier Inn. They’ll be out on the Wildflower Bank outside the school soon, along with the rest of the flowers. For more information on Cowslips click here.

It’s a difficult time for all at the moment, but if there’s any consolation it’s that we’re going into it in spring. I hope people will use it as an opportunity to watch wildlife – it’s good distraction, proven to be good for your wellbeing and could create a greater sense of nature connectedness, which in turn might increase actions people take to help wildlife.

Plant, Picnic, Pick, Skate and Create – a FREE fun event for all – now delayed until the Coronavirus is passed its peak….

We will reschedule once the Coronoavirus has passed its peak

What, well there’s all sorts, something for everyone, all ages and abilities welcome, the event will be held at an accessible ♿️ venue: 




😀 Meet your neighbours
🧁 Eat nice food
☕️ Have a cuppa
🛹 Skate lesson with Shredder – Contact Max to book your session at: shredderskateschool@gmail.com (help with the litter pick and/or tree planting to qualify for your free lesson)
🚯 Litter pick
🌲 Plant a tree
🎨 Create art about our Orchard 
🏍 Learn about Orchard Park’s Shared Electric Trike
🎥 Watch films about our local wildlife and how to help
🦔 Make a pledge to help our community and wildlife

When: Sunday 5 April 10-4

Cost: FREE £0.00

Where: Meet at Orchard Park Community Multi Function Room CB4 2GW, next to Orchard Park Skate Park and Wildlife Area – see map below

The day is being run in conjunction with Orchard Park Community Council, the National Lottery’s Community Fund as it celebrates its 25th year #CelebrateNationalLottery25, and is registered with Keep Britain Tidy as a Great British Spring Clean 2020 event #GBSpringClean. We’re grateful to The National Lottery #CelebrateNationalLottery25 and Orchard Park Community Council for providing funds to make this event happen.

We’ll provide some delicious cakes and refreshments, and you can bring extra food and drink to share. It’ll be a chance to meet and get to know your neighbours – an early Big Lunch – the official Eden Project Communities Big Lunch date is 6-7 June 2020 #THEBIGLUNCH

Help us cleanup Orchard Park, and plant a fruit tree or two in return for a free lesson with Max from Shredder Skate School, who strive to bring the joys of skateboarding and stunt scootering to anyone that wishes to start. Contact Max to book your
session at: shredderskateschool@gmail.com

Orchard Park’s Shared Electric Trike, funded by South Cambridgeshire’s District Council’s South Zero Carbon Communities Grant set up after declaring a Climate Emergency, will be used to move the collected litter and recycling around OP – and there’ll be a chance to learn more about the project and how you could use the trike.

We’ll be creating art to make a sign for the Orchard, showing the importance of orchards for wildlife “A variety of flora and fauna can be supported by this environment – insects, birds, bees, bats, foxes and small mammals as well as wild flowers…. Orchards can protect bumblebees simply by creating a habitat for them to exist. Both honey bees and bumblebees are beneficial in pollinating orchards.” 

🦠Coronoavirus – If you’re feeling unwell and experiencing any symptoms of the coronavirus – a cough, a high temperature, shortness of breath – please do not attend the event, stay at home and seek medical advice by calling the 111 coronavirus service. Facilities for hand washing – the Government’s focus to control the disease – are available at the Multi Use Room. Look out for the latest NHS advice. Of course if the latest advice suggests public events should be cancelled, we’ll postpone our event and reschedule.