The Ten Thousand Strong Throng 22.09.18 #PeoplesWalkforWildlife

Ten Thousand People walking for wildlife down Whitehall

Photo credit: @LukeDrayPhoto/@WoodlandTrust

As Chris Packham worked with artists and designers to create the heart image above, he said he wanted it to be “filled with life and the message not a suggestion but a command. Because if we don’t LOVE LIFE. ALL LIFE then we are in big trouble.”

On Saturday 22 September 2018, 10,000 people took part in Chris Packham’s People’s Walk for Wildlife to show we love our wildlife.

You probably didn’t know anything about the march. The BBC, and ITV chose not to cover this important, all good news story. The Independent (click here for video footage), Sky News (click here), the Guardian (click here) and London Evening Standard (click here) did. There’s a lot of coverage on Twitter too #PeoplesWalkforWildlife

As we gathered, there were songs and talks – infotainment from prominent wildlife presenters. The ‘Ministers’ that wrote the Manifesto shared their expertise and passion, and young ambassadors for wildlife roused the crowd.

We set off from Reformers Tree in Hyde Park to Downing Street, to deliver the People’s Manifesto for Wildlife by Chris Packham et al. to Number 10. It rained most of the day, we were sodden and soggy, but that didn’t dampen our spirits. We marched or wheeled to the sound of birdsong playing from our phones. It was a fantastic, joyous, hopeful, and energising day. People do care. That’s important to hold onto, especially for when, as happens on some occasions in Orchard Park, our efforts feel a little bit futile.

OPWP will be taking the ideas from the Manifesto and promoting action in OP – for a summary of ideas you can do easily, see our blog post from last week: Ending the War on Wildlife. A People’s Manifesto For Wildlife, Draft One, Chris Packham et al.

  • Are there particular wildlife themed activities you’d like to see in Orchard Park?
  • Are their barriers to you getting involved?
  • What would encourage you to get involved in taking steps to help our lovely, local, diverse, urban wildlife?

Please do let us know 🙏

To download the full People’s Manifesto for Wildlife, click here: http://www.chrispackham.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/Peoples-Manifesto-Download.pdf

Let your Environment Minister know how important wildlife conservation is to you.  Download the Love Life Postcard , print it out and post it. It is pre-addressed to our Environment Minister and includes a message. Simply sign, add a stamp and post.

 

 

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Ring Fort Road Wildflower Bank in Macro

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Bristly Oxtongue Helminthotheca echioides

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Wild Carrot Daucus carota seed head

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Dandelion Taraxacum officinale seed head

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Ribwort Plantain Plantago lanceolata

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Yarrow Achillea millefolium

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Creeping thistle Cirsium arvense seed head

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Tufted Vetch Vicia cracca

Field Scabious Knautia arvensis

Field Scabious Knautia arvensis seed head

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Knapweed Centaurea sp.

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Knapweed Centaurea sp. seed head

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Lady’s Bedstraw Galium verum

The Wildflower Bank outside the school is well due for a full cut according to our Orchard Park Habitats Management Plan written for us by the Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire, Orchard Park Wildlife Project is working with Orchard Park Community Council to try to ensure cutting times are optimal for maintaining maximum plant diversity, which of course improves invertebrate diversity, and then in turn in this location in Orchard Park mammal and bird diversity. This is a very valuable habitat with 97% of the UK’s ancient flower meadows having been destroyed since the 1930s.

Prior to cutting, I wanted to grab a few photos of a few flowers and seed heads. If you take a moment to look, they’re beautiful, colourful, intricate, and fascinating structures. In a very small patch there’s a lot of diversity to be seen over there. Go and have a look 🙂

Plants and Animals of the Wildflower Bank this page has information and photos of everything we’ve identified over there so far.

And PLEASE DON’T USE OUR WILDFLOWER BANK AS A RUBBISH DUMP AND DOG TOILET! Let’s work together to make Orchard Park better for people and wildlife 🙂

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Wild Carrot Daucus carota flowers and seed heads

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ending the War on Wildlife. A People’s Manifesto For Wildlife, Draft One, Chris Packham et al.

Let’s end the war on wildlife.

‘Between 1970 and 2013, 56% of UK species declined. Of the nearly 8,000 species assessed using modern criteria, 15% are threatened with extinction. This suggests that we are among the most nature-depleted countries in the world.

Of the 218 countries assessed for ‘biodiversity intactness’, the UK is ranked 189, a consequence of centuries of industrialisation, urbanisation and overexploitation of our natural resources.’

– ​State of Nature Report, 2016

Our wildlife needs us – and it needs you more than ever. 

It’s easy to imagine that ‘they’ will fix the environment. But ‘they’ won’t, whoever ‘they’ are. ​We​ need to do it – ​me​ and ​you​. Together we are stronger. Together we can make a difference.

 

Today, Chris Packham launched The People’s Manifesto for Wildlife. This blog post is sourced entirely from the manifesto which makes a series of recommendations to the fields of Education; Wildlife and Animal Welfare; Wildlife Crime, Law, and Protection; Farming; UK Statutory Conservation Agencies; and Rewildling. It also makes recommendations, on amongst many other things: trees, hedgerows and verges, and urban spaces.

Urban space for wildlife is the domain of Orchard Park Wildlife Project. And urban spaces CAN be some of the most biologically diverse habitats in the country.

Access to nature is a human need – central to the quality of our most fundamental physiological requirements (water, air, food), as well as our physical, mental and emotional wellbeing.

The manifesto states that:

“Urban areas can be some of the most biologically diverse habitats in the country. Gardens and parks – comprising lawn, shrubs and flowering plants – provide food and shelter for a huge array of wildlife. And yet these spaces are disappearing from our towns and cities.

In a report published in 2016, the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) said the percentage of front gardens lost to paving, concrete or gravel had risen to 24%, from just 8% in 20051​ .​ The results, based on a poll of 1,492 people, suggested that more than 4.5 million of Great Britain’s front gardens were entirely paved, while 7.2 million were mostly paved. Another report, published by London Wildlife Trust in 2011, compared aerial surveys of London taken in 1998 and 2006. It found that domestic gardens (both front and back) made up nearly 24 per cent of the London’s total area, but that in those eight years nearly two thirds of its front gardens had been covered with hard surfaces, while the amount of green space in back gardens had shrunk, largely due to the popularity of garden offices2​ .​ “An area of vegetated garden equivalent to 21 times the size of Hyde park was lost between 1998 and 2006,” said the author of the report, Chloë Smith. That’s an average of two Hyde Parks per year (and a further 14 Hyde Parks since 2011).”

 

It goes on to say “We need legislation to re-wild our urban spaces.”

We are lucky in Orchard Park that many of the recommendations in the manifesto are already realised:

many of our fences are hedgehog friendly, we have bird nesting boxes on some of our homes, municipal planting includes many native species, and we have open green spaces.

However, there are recommendations that show there is much more we can do:

  • We can ensure that no more than 10% of our gardens are turned over to paving, decking and fake-turfing
  • We can make gardens more hedgehog friendly
  • We can add more nest boxes in addition to those already built into our homes – if you live in a house or flat, install swift or bat boxes by the eaves.
  • Where space permits, plant a small tree or shrub in your garden
  • Do home composting
  • We need to ensure our small pockets of green for the community are maintained in as a wildlife friendly a way as possible, and look after our trees
  • If we can find a suitable location, create a communal wildlife pond
  • Create ‘pop up habitats’ in the few as yet undeveloped plots – sprinkle pesticide free wildflower seeds
  • Keep cats in at night – this can reduce overall predation by up to 50%, and fit them will a collar and bell – this can also reduce bird predation by 50%
  • If you have a garden, stop using pesticides – weedkillers, ant sprays, slug pellets.
  • Liberate your lawn, let some grass grow long, leave piles of sticks in corners for invertebrates, sow native wild flowers for pollinators, feed garden birds, erect bee and bird boxes
  • Dig a pond – even a washing-up bowl-sized pond will boost biodiversity
  • Connect with nature through what you eat. Grow some food – rocket and tomatoes in window boxes; cucumbers, runner beans, raspberries, blackberries. Home-grown tastes amazing
  • Volunteer with OPWP to look after and enhance what we have, lets make Orchard Park better for people and wildlife
  • Join OPWP on it’s surveys, and safaris, you’ll be surprised to see what lives here if you look

 

The full, referenced, manifesto can be downloaded here: http://www.chrispackham.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/A-Peoples-Manifesto-for-Wildlife-expanded.pdf

The illustrated manifesto can be downloaded here: http://www.chrispackham.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/Peoples-Manifesto-Download.pdf

 

 

 

OP Clean Up Day

Clean up day poster 30:9

Make a Seed Feeder 

To promote reuse Orchard Park Wildlife Project will provide instructions on how to make seed feeders for the birds out of plastic bottles. So save a bottle from your litter pick, grab the instructions, and you’ll be able to take away a free bag of seeds to fill your feeder 🙂

Help to Clean our Wildlife Habitats

Although the Wildlife Area and Wildflower Bank are probably cleaner than they’ve been for a long time, we hope a few people will go to these areas during the litter pick. We especially need help in the Wildlife Area to remove the last of the polystyrene packing materials – the small stuff that often gets over looked. It sticks around in the environment for more than a million years, as polystyrene is not biodegradable. Though it is slow to break down chemically, it does fragment into small pieces, choking animals that ingest it, clogging their digestive systems.

Details from OPCC Facebook Page:

Orchard Park Community Clean up day at Unwin Square (in front of the One Stop).

♻️Community Litter Pick:
Equipment will be provided by South Cambs
Wear suitable clothing
Refreshments will be provided
Children under 18 must be accompanied by a responsible adult

♻️ Household Recycling:
On the day the skips and truck will collect:
🔌Electrical – to include small items such as lamps, hairdryers, Electric Toothbrushes, White Goods (including Fridges, Freezers Washing Machines etc) Basically anything with a plug on it.
🔩 Metal – bedsteads, bicycles , BBQs, shelving etc
🚪 Wood – shelving, furniture, doors etc
👚 Textiles – good items of clothing for the Take it or leave it
📚 Books – for the Take it or leave it

Please note:
🙅DO NOT bring Black bin waste
🙅DO NOT bring Blue bin waste
🙅DO NOT bring Green bin waste

♻️ ‘Take it or Leave it’ Freecycling stall:
Miscellaneous items in good condition for the take it or leave it table including clothing games, books and household items.

In collaboration with South Cambs District Council, Combined Waste Service, Orchard Park Wildlife Project, and Orchard Park Community Council

Angry Birds

 

I made a comment a few days ago “wow there’s a lot of angry birds in my garden”. I watch them a lot to see if I can identify patterns in their behaviour, to find out which species/individuals always get the food, and which species/individuals get the water to drink or bathe in. Over the last week or so I’ve had a Robin (Erithacus rubecula) with an almost bald head visiting, I’m not certain but it might also have something wrong with its right eye, so I always look out for that particular bird to see that it manages some food before it’s bullied away by another bird. Having looked it up, it seems the poor Robin might have mites, and there’s not much to be done except making sure it gets food. As I write I think it’s just appeared at the suet pellets – but I don’t want to move too much to check and then scare it away, and I can hear and see aggressive Goldfinches (Carduelis carduelis) fighting each other for the nyger seed. The Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) seem to be the most aggressive though.

 

Luckily, Twitter served up a paper last night entitled “Dominance hierarchies and foraging strategies in supplementally fed garden birds”. It explains that aggression and competition for resources use a lot of energy, and fighting causes injury and sometimes death. So often, when the competition is ‘won’ repeatedly by particular individuals, a hierarchy will be formed with certain birds being dominant or subordinate, and they come to assess their chances of winning a fight prior to engaging.

 

The paper also states that three quarters of UK households regularly feed the birds. By feeding them, we are likely to have enhanced the survival and reproductive success of birds, but we are also likely to have increased the competition for food, both within and between species. Research reported in the paper found that socially dominant, heavier species of birds with higher body mass, monopolise access to higher value foods. Whereas lighter species were constrained to food with lower value. This has implications for conservation when supplemental feeding is being used as a tool.

 

Advice from the RSPB states: to reduce competition, offer a variety of food, and if possible space it out in your garden. Think of the smaller bird species and offer food in hanging feeders with cages which the larger species can’t get in. If you have a wooden post, you can fill cracks with suet, to attract small agile birds such as Blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) and Great tits (Parus major). Dunnocks (Prunella modularis) hop around under hedges and like to feed on the ground, so food can be put on a tray on the ground for them, or small amounts suet pellets can be scattered directly onto the ground.