Less litter at the Wildlife Area

Many thanks to Orchard Park Community Council for organising the litter pick today, and to everyone who came to help. It was surprisingly warm, and the sun came out soon after 10am. A few of us went back to the Orchard Community Centre for tea and biscuits afterwards.

Although there was a lot of litter when we arrived, it wasn’t as bad as it has been on other occasions. As usual cans, bottles, and crisp bags were the most numerous items. Particularly concerning are the small pieces of polystyrene packaging. They seem to have come from one large package – we’ve been picking these up for four years now, and yet a lot remain. Animals can eat the pieces causing clogging of the digestive tract and choking. We really need to make sure that no more pieces get into the Wildlife Area, and keep working away to remove these remaining hundreds or thousands of polystyrene bits.

For information on the dangers of litter to wildlife see previous posts:

Litter Pick at the Wildlife Area

The Wildlife Area is Clean 🙂

Yet again, disgusting levels of litter at the Wildlife Area and balancing pond

What is wrong with people?

Litter 😦

Successful litter pick

We hope to share our 2017 activity plan for the rest of the year very soon.

 

 

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Birds on the Busway

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Waxwing feeding along the busway near the Science Park bus stop

On Thursday I heard that a museum (that’s their collective noun) of Waxwings (Bombycilla garrulous) had been seen on the busway near the Science Park busway stop. I woke early this morning and decided I’d go along to see if I could find them.

On the way in the cold and mist I saw around ten nests from last year in the hedge, robins, blackbirds, goldfinches, magpies, pied wagtails, blue tits, great tits, and squirrels.

Then as the Science Park busway stop came into view, I spotted a group of birds with crests on their heads, and thought that must be them. I stopped to  look more closely, and yes, there were about 15-20 feeding.

They’re not permanent residents here, but every three or four years when food is scarce in Scandinavia they arrive along the east coast from October to March moving inland in search of berries, particularly rowan and hawthorn. These birds, similar to Starlings in size, come in large numbers known as irruptions.

I was expecting them to be quite noisy, but I didn’t hear any sounds. The video by the RSPB  shows them feeding noisily.

Video of Waxwings from RSPB website

Litter Pick at the Wildlife Area

Poster created by OPCC

Poster created by Orchard Park Community Council

Join us on 17 February at 10:00–14:00 to tidy up the Wildlife Area, Ring Fort Road, near the sports ground. As OPWP has informed on many occasions (see links below), litter is very dangerous to our wildlife. Please come along, even if you can spare just ten minutes, every single can/bag/bottle that is removed is helpful to our local wildlife. Being in the Wildlife Area, volunteering, and gentle exercise is good for you too 🙂 We hope to see you there.

Yet again, disgusting levels of litter at the Wildlife Area and balancing pond

Litter 😦

Successful litter pick

Litter at the Wildlife Area