Wildlife Awareness via an Artistic Lens, and Celebrating all things Apple

 

We had a great time on Saturday afternoon with Kettle’s Yard celebrating our orchard and its wildlife. Our tiny ‘Spartan’ apples are very cute. If we feed the trees and ensure they’re looked after properly we may be rewarded with larger crops in the future. Many thanks to Kate, Scott, Giovanna, and two Andrews for between them buying, washing, chopping, macerating and pressing apples, so we could appreciate fresh juice, and dealing with all the tidying up! Thanks are also due to Histon and Impington Community Orchard Project for lending us their equipment.

Many children enjoyed decorating tiles, with Karen Thomas from Kettle’s Yard and artist Rosanna Martin, to depict some of the 200 different types of animals and plants we’ve identified so far in the orchard and around Orchard Park. They will be fired and placed around Orchard Park as part of artist Isabella Martin’s ‘You Are Here’ project whilst she is artist in residence for North Cambridge. Thanks for letting us look at our wildlife through an artistic lens, and we look forward to the next phase 🙂

 

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OPWP has ID’d OP’s Apples

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Photo credit: Kate Parsley

Many thanks to Kate from OPWP for going to Cambridge University Botanic Garden’s Apple Day today to identify the variety of apples in Orchard Park. We now know around OP we have the Ribston Pippin and the Spartan, both eating apples. We hope you’ll join us at our event on 29th October 1-4pm with Kettle’s Yard, and Inder’s Kitchen to celebrate our Orchard and its wildlife. Juicing, chutney making, and OP’s Orchard Wildlife, free, fun, informative and accessible. For details see: Next event at the Orchard – Saturday 29 October 2016 1-4pm

According to the Trees of Antiquity website:

Ribston Pippin originated in Yorkshire, England, around 1700 as a dessert apple, and was grown from three apple pips (seeds) sent from Normandy to Sir Henry Goodricke of Ribston Hall at Knaresborough, in Yorkshire, in 1709. Only one seed germinated and matured. The original tree was blown down in 1810, but was propped up and lived until 1928. This is a highly esteemed Victorian dessert apple. Ribston Pippin is also referred to as the Glory of York. Juicy, firm deep cream-colored flesh has an intense, rich, aromatic apple flavor, along with an intense sharpness. Skin striped red over greenish-yellow, with russet patches. Parent of the famous Cox’s Orange Pippin. Consider Grimes Golden, Liberty and/or White Pearmain for pollination. Triploid.”

The provenance of the Spartan is less well understood. The Garden Action website says:

“This variety was purpose bred in Canada for commercial use. Remarkably even though the apples were bred under controlled conditions, the parentage is not known. Originally the apple was thought to be cross between McIntosh and Newton. Now however, genetic testing has proved that Newton was not one of the parents. McIntosh, yes, Newton definitely not!….

The apple flesh is white and crispy with lots of juice if eaten straight off the tree.”

 

Thanks again to Lush for a fun and batty time at the Charity Pot Party

Thanks again to @LushCambridge for a fun and batty time yesterday. We’re always so grateful for the support we get from Lush, we bought our bat detector with money raised by one of their Charity Pot Party fundraisers. This time we were promoting #WildAboutGardens week and encouraging folks to take a simple step to help bats. Lots of people agreed to do something this week – just look at the bat above covered in symbols each of which represents a pledge: to add a water feature, keep cats in at dusk, reduce lighting, go organic, make a bat home, provide a bug hotel, or add insect friendly plants.

For more info on how you can help bats see: Wild About Gardens Week Resources

 

Next event at the Orchard – Saturday 29 October 2016 1-4pm

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Our next event will be in the Orchard, behind the sports ground on Ring Fort Rd (see map) on Saturday 29th October 2016 1-4pm. We’ll be working with artists from Kettle’s Yard to explore our place and wildlife.

Create your own ceramic signs which celebrate the amazing variety of apples growing Orchard Park.  The signs and labels will be left in the Orchard area permanently to help visitor identify the apples growing and find out about them. They will also form part of You Are Here, a new map of North Cambridge being created by Open House artist in residence, Isabella Martin.

We’ll have an apple press on loan from Histon and Impington Community Orchard Project and Inder’s Kitchen will be there making apple chutney.

More details will follow soon.

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Inder’s Kitchen – Curry for Community Good

 

The Inder’s Kitchen ‘Curry for Community Good’ programme

We’ve partnered with Inder’s Kitchen in Cambridge to raise funds for the Orchard Park Wildlife Project. What better way to raise money than by enjoying delicious curries from Inder’s frozen Indian ready meal range, delivered directly to you seven days a week?

‘If there was a Michelin Star for takeaways, Inder’s Kitchen would have one. Good cooking, great flavours.’ Charles Campion – BBC MasterChef judge and restaurant critic

Look out for us at the Orchard event on 29 October, we’ll be making apple chutney, and serving delicious dishes at the Orchard Park Christmas Fair on 3rd December.

Enjoy great meals and raise £10 for the Wildlife Project

 For your first order, Inder will donate £10, and then a further £2 each time you order again.

You’ll also get £5 off your first order.

The attractions of the Inder’s Kitchen frozen ready meal range are:

  • Great curries and great value (for starters, there’s no VAT on frozen food)
  • Healthy eating, with 85% of dishes containing fewer than 500 calories and 85% gluten free
  • £5 off all first orders
  • Convenient online ordering and next day delivery, nationwide

The Wildlife Project will benefit from the following:

  • £10 donation for every initial order
  • £2 donation for every repeat order

These donations are possible on direct orders from Inder’s Kitchen, as spreading the word this way means that Inder can donate money good causes, as opposed to spending it on expensive advertising.

Order online at www.inderskitchen.com, or call 01223 211 333. Use the promotional code CHR7PK2 to enable Inder and the team to track orders and pay donations.

Thank you. Happy eating!

@LushCambridge Charity Pot Party 22/10/16 Going Batty for #WildAboutGardensWeek

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This year’s Wild About Gardens Week is 24-30 October 2016. It’s focussing on simple steps we can take to support bats and other wildlife. There are lots of things you can do right now to support wildlife in your garden or community green space. Come along to @LushCambridge on Saturday 22nd October to find out how you can help our local bats.

The lovely folks @LushCambridge are very generously holding another Charity Pot Party for Orchard Park Wildlife Project – so please consider buying a pot of the gorgeous smelling lotion that makes your skin silky smooth (like a bat’s wing?!?!). The proceeds will allow Orchard Park Wildlife Project to purchase the tools and equipment we need to run our free community events that aim to make Orchard Park better for wildlife and people.

We’ll have plenty of ideas so you can prepare for Wild About Gardens Week and find out about how you can help our local bats, and we’d like you to pledge to do something to help them during Wild About Gardens Week. There’ll be fun bat masks and bat puppets which you can decorate and in plenty of time for Halloween. We’ll show you how a bat detector works (Orchard Park Wildlife Project bought our detector with funds kindly raised by a Lush Charity Pot Party) and you can listen to bat calls. Lush staff will be looking a bit batty too!

From the Wild About Gardens Week Website:

“Wild About Gardens Week 2016 is a joint initiative by the RHS, The Wildlife Trusts and Bat Conservation Trust to encourage people to support wildlife in their gardens, with a focus on our UK bats. This is more important than ever. In 2013, wildlife researchers found that 60 percent of UK animal and plant species have declined in the past 50 years. Among the variety of reasons for this is loss of habitat.

Many of our common garden species – bats, hedgehogs, house sparrows, and common frogs, for example – are becoming much less common. There are an estimated 15 million gardens in the UK. Together they cover a greater area than all the National nature reserves! By making our own gardens and local green spaces more wildlife-friendly, we can help support a wide range of species.”

For information on threats to bats in the UK see the Bat Conservation Trust page: why bats are declining.

We hope to see you there – do come along and say hello 🙂

Tracking Terrapins in Cambridge

 

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Screen grab from Tracking Terrapins website homepage

Tracking Terrapins in Cambridge is a new website to track sightings of these invasive species in the Cambridgeshire area. It was set up by the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Amphibian and Reptile Group.

From the website “Terrapins are an invasive species in the UK, they often find their way into local waterways after growing too large for their owners to keep. Here the terrapins are free from any natural predators and can have disastrous effects on local ecosystems. We would like your help to report any sightings within Cambridgeshire so we can build a better understanding of how numerous they are. Eventually we intend to assess how much of an impact they have on local wildlife”.

Click on the Tracking Terrapins in Cambridge link below the photo to go to the website, more details on the project, and to see how you can help.

Hedgehog Gardens: Histon, Impington and Orchard Park launched on Saturday

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The new local initiative to help hedgehogs was launched at the Histon and Impington Community Orchard Project event on Saturday. The main aim is to encourage people to open their gardens, and encourage their neighbours to do the same, so that gardens are accessible to hedgehogs. Hedgehogs need to move around quite large areas to feed, find mates and shelter. We want you to create hedgehog highways to provide what they need. See the website for details of what you can do to help: hedgehoggardens.wordpress.com. If we don’t work together hedgehogs could be extinct in the UK in a few decades.

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We met Paul from the Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire and their hedgehog mascot @harryhedgehog7 we hope we can collaborate to enhance all of our efforts.